Volume 6, Issue 1, February 2018, Page: 1-4
Inactivation of α-Amylase by Caffeine: Reducing the Break-down of Starch into Sugars
Neel Rajan, Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, Du Bois, PA 15801, USA
Stephen James Koellner, Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, Du Bois, PA 15801, USA
Vincent Todd Calabrese, Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, Du Bois, PA 15801, USA
Arshad Khan, Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, Du Bois, PA 15801, USA
Received: Dec. 23, 2017;       Accepted: Dec. 28, 2017;       Published: Jan. 11, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.bio.20180601.11      View  1807      Downloads  102
Abstract
α-Amylase, an enzyme present in our saliva and pancreatic secretion, is responsible for the break-down of starch into glucose molecules. Glucose enters into our blood steam and provides energy for various activities. In this study we have noticed that in the presence of caffeine, the enzyme activity is decreased with a decrease in the amount of glucose liberated from the starch hydrolysis. This finding suggests a positive role played by caffeine in the controlling of blood sugar. A possible explanation of enzyme inactivation by caffeine has been discussed in terms of a two-step model that we proposed earlier.
Keywords
Caffeine-Amylase Interaction, Inactivation of α-Amylase by Caffeine, Reducing the Starch Hydrolysis by Caffeine
To cite this article
Neel Rajan, Stephen James Koellner, Vincent Todd Calabrese, Arshad Khan, Inactivation of α-Amylase by Caffeine: Reducing the Break-down of Starch into Sugars, American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2018, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.bio.20180601.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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